Tony Ortega Defends Village Voice Classifieds Backpage. Says The Victims Are The Problem.

 

 

 

Making money off the backs of desperate human beings and homeless children, by allowing them to be exploited for modern-day sex slavery is not a problem for Tony Ortega.

After months of protests on human trafficking against the Village Voice classifieds section Backpage with regards to the child sex trafficking, which included  the voices of Alcia Keys, Ashton Kutcher, Demi Moore, REM, and Roseanne Cash . Tony Ortega took aim at a target and unleashed a violent torrent of verbal assaults at CNN’s Amber Lyons in defense of Backpage, the classified’s section of the Village Voice, where he is the editor in chief.  Also known as the head honcho under Mike Lacey.

During the tirade he excluded the words “child sex trafficking” and used the phrase “underage prostitutes”.   Positioning the victims as simply prostitutes that had not yet come of age. As if prostitution is a pre existing condition in their fate.

He pounded the phrase “underage” into the ground over and over in his version of events.  His justifications?   Backpage is the Red Cross, and the victims are “A persistent problem in this country”.  If they exist at all. Furthermore, they are the “users of the service. Most drug addicted and homeless”.  And, it is easier to find them when they are being sold on the Internet by their traffickers than if they are at bus stations!

So, all in all, Backpage is helping the community by providing a platform for them to be sold. Furthermore, they are not children.  They are underage prostitutes.    And “sex work” can be an honorable profession for a minor. It is just not shown in a positive light.

“In cities across America, we are told over and over, like a mantra, that “100,000 to 300,000” underage sex slaves have been stashed away from public view, with more joining them every day.

Not only do we have security specialists making constant searches for keywords that might indicate an underage user, but we’re quick to cooperate with law enforcement and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children when we find suspicious ads.”   Tony Oretega    July 06, 2011  In defense of Backpage. Village Voice classifieds.

NOTE: At the time of this retort defending Village Voice Classifieds Backpage, According to Advanced Interactive Media Group, an online classified advertising consultancy, 70 per cent of the nation’s online ads for adult services (read, prostitution) run on Backpage.com.

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) viewed Backpage as so tightly tied to the sale of children for rape that the website is now the first place it searches for children reported missing. In a 2016 amicus brief, the organization outlined the ways in which it believes that Backpage has been deliberately optimized to keep the child trafficking industry going, including having relaxed posting rules for escort ads while requiring other sellers to provide valid telephone numbers. It also describes a case in which one child was “sold for sex more than 50 times on backpage.com beginning when she was 12 years old.” The organization has worked on more than 420 cases in which children were trafficked through Backpage.

In the three years prior:  At least 50 charges of trafficking had been filed by state attorneys general against people advertising on Backpage.com. It was estimated that 100,000 to 250,000 children in the U.S. are trafficked each year.

Village Voice Media (Mike Lacey, James Larkin, Tony Ortega and Liz McDougall) insisted it was fighting trafficking by editing out code words for minors like “fresh” and “new to town” – to make the ads look quote “cleaner than ever” ….But congressional investigators found Backpage was actively allowing the traffickers to operate, and knowingly editing the advertisements to facilitate the sex trafficking of children, and pocketing the ad revenue.

“In some cases, our reports about suspicious ads have resulted in underage runaways being traced and recovered—as opposed to the underground economy of bus stations and street corners where kids are truly invisible.

Underage prostitution is a persistent problem in this country, but as we established in last week’s cover story, it exists at a level that is nothing like what is being trumpeted by Amber Lyon on the behalf of activists who want to put us out of business. Lyon and other journalists—even the New York Times—may repeat uncritically the figure of “100,000 to 300,000” underage prostitutes, but as we showed last week, that number is based on a flimsy study by a couple of activist professors who included in that figure runaways (most of whom are back home in a week) and any teen who happens to live near an international border, supposedly putting them “at risk.”

Using official law enforcement data, we showed that underage prostitution arrests are closer to 800 per year for the entire country—a number that has not increased over the past decade. Far from a widespread and rapidly growing problem, this is, instead, a small problem that stays about the same size because its underlying causes—drug addiction and teen homelessness—are not targeted with federal funds the way scaremongering is.

In December, we sent information to CNN about what we’re doing to keep Backpage.com‘s adult pages for adults only as Amber Lyon prepared a sensationalistic piece about the mythic hundreds of thousands of underage American sex slaves, for whom she wanted us to appear responsible.

We subsequently pointed out to CNN that we had, in fact, provided Lyon with a two-page, single-spaced data sheet about what we’re doing to keep underage users out of Backpage.com‘s adult pages.

She talks to men who are undergoing counseling for paying for sex—none of them with underage girls. Each of these segments is intended simply to make viewers see sex work in the worst possible light. And that’s no accident.

Tony Ortega    In defense of Backpage .   Village Voice classifieds. Editor in Chief Village Voice    July 06, 2011

http://www.villagevoice.com/news/cnns-amber-lyon-ambushed-craigslist-but-she-wont-talk-to-the-village-voice-6431659

NOTE: For the record, there is no such thing as an “underage prostitute” .  Minors are trafficking victims.  There is no such thing as a child prostitute. By definition & law, minors are trafficked.

Ortega says Village Voice has always had classifieds. True, when it was a local newspaper, not a web site.  Before it went digital and spread out across the planet.

“I helped turn a weekly newspaper with a web site into a digital enterprise.”  Tony Ortega bragged to the New York Times Blog Media Decoder on September 14, 2012 after leaving the Village Voice.

https://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/14/at-village-voice-editor-and-music-editor-depart-and-weekly-will-have-a-new-address/

News broke within days after Ortega was let go, ( The Village Voice was sold )that Lacey and Larkin had sold the failing Village Voice Newspaper, but split Backpage from the sale and kept it.  Their arrest warrant claim that Lacey and Larkin each received a $10 million “bonus” in 2014 — before the sale.

Tony Ortega’s former co worker Bob Norman, from the New Times Broward Palm Beach (Also owned by Mike Lacey and James Larkin) says Tony Ortega is well known for his love of “erotica” ( writing , pictures or films to stimulate sexual desire / pornographic books, pictures, considered stylish or sophisticated )  So perhaps Ortega is viewing through a jaded different lens.

http://www.journalnow.com/opinion/editorials/our-view-human-trafficking-is-a-scourge-we-must-stop/article_b626a0ba-77af-5193-b64e-28e969e73f27.html

Current campaigns challenging Ortega’s declarations:

hmls

hlsgrl

http://www.iamjanedoefilm.com

Backpage.com – now separated from Village Voice – denies problem but Amsterdam experience tells different story

NOTE: Another report I am archiving for reference.  News Latitude Archives – As News Latitude’s Twitter has been inactive since 2013. This article appears to have been written in 2013 after Lacey and Larkin sold the Voice in September of 2012, split with Ortega,  and walked away with Backpage.

Dutch lessons for sex-trafficking debate in U.S.

 Julia Rooke By JULIA ROOKE

 

Over the past few years the pressure had been mounting. Activists, senators, attorney generals, non-profits as well as New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof had all been accusing the classified site Backpage.com of promoting the illegal sex trade and enabling human trafficking. And they weren’t just targeting the classified site, they were also going after its parent company Village Voice Media, owner of the iconic New York weekly the Village Voice.

This week it was announced that the Village Voice and 12 other alternative weeklies of the same ilk are parting ways with Backpage. com. They have been sold to the Voice Media company whose new CEO admitted that the controversy around Backpage.com “has been a distraction, there’s no doubt about it.”

Backpage.com, meanwhile, remains the property of Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin, the two Arizona-based men who started their very successful media chain in 1970 as students with the alternative free weekly, The Phoenix New Times. 

As we reported previously in Latitude News, the controversy over the Backpage.com ads and their links to the trafficking of underage girls make for an interesting contrast with what happened in Amsterdam a few years ago.

 

Whose numbers are right?

According to Advanced Interactive Media Group, an online classified advertising consultancy, 70 per cent of the nation’s online ads for adult services (read, prostitution) run on Backpage.com. In the last three years, at least 50 charges of trafficking have been filed by state attorneys general against people advertising on Backpage.com. It’s estimated that 100,000 to 250,000 children in the U.S. are trafficked each year.

When they were part of the same company, the response from the Village Voice to the charges against Backpage.com was robust. Tony Ortega, who was editor of Village Voice until a few weeks ago, called underage trafficking an imaginary problem, driven by “mass panic.” He characterized the estimate of up to a quarter million kids trafficked a year “guesses by activist professors, junk science by nonprofit groups trying to extract money from Congress, and manipulation by religious groups hiding their real agendas about sex work.” He cited FBI data showing that on average about 200 underage kids a year are saved from forced prostitution. Lacey and Larkin, by all accounts, are unlikely to change this tune.

Moral Panic in Amsterdam

The Netherlands has been through a similar debate, even though in that country both adult prostitution and pimping are legal. Starting in 2006, a spate of alarmist TV and press reports claimed Dutch school girls were being groomed for prostitution by a new brand of pimp known as a “Lover Boy.” Lover Boys were purported to be second- and third-generation Dutch Moroccans and Antilleans. Frank Bovenkerk, a cultural anthropologist from the University of Amsterdam, scoffed. Bovenkerk, in fact, suggested this was just a symptom of “moral panic” (sound familiar?) and an attempt to demonize second-generation immigrants.

The mayor of Amsterdam commissioned Bovenkerk to get to the bottom of the allegations. What Bovenkerk found, in a 2006 report [in Dutch] updated in 2011 in the academic journal Crime, Media, Culture, was that Lover Boys were real. He estimated that there were 100 of them in Amsterdam, and that they each controlled several legal prostitutes, a large number of whom had been recruited as children.

Bovenkerk’s findings shocked the Dutch, stimulated a national debate and contributed to the closing of 51 red-light prostitution windows and some brothels in Amsterdam in 2007 and 2008.

The Dutch reacted to a research report, which estimated that a few hundred girls were at risk. In the U.S., the FBI’s number of 200 a year is used as proof that the problem is overblown. Backpage.com counsel Liz McDougall has, in the past, even argued that because it cooperates with prosecutors, it is better for all that the site not pull its adult services ads offline.

The sad truth is it’s extraordinarily hard to get girls to testify against their pimps, whether it be in the U.S. or in places like the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Jean Custers, head of the Dutch Trafficking police team, says “girls are terrorized, pimps sometimes threaten to harm younger members of their families if they talk. Very few girls are prepared to testify in such a situation.” As Kristof noted earlier this year in his New York Times column, in the U.S., police often detain girls instead of rescuing them.

Andrea Powell thinks that, unlike the Netherlands, the U.S. is refusing to acknowledge its trafficking issue. Her anti-trafficking organization, FAIR Girls, sees about 1,000 girls a year in Washington, D.C. “A fifth tell us they are being groomed or pimped,” says Powell.

Backpage.com and its kind will certainly continue to come under pressure from lawmakers, although in one of the latest showdowns, in the state of Washington, Village Voice Media won a temporary restraining order against a state law that for the first time forced advertisers to provide documentary proof that their escorts are over 18. Lacey, according to The Arizona Republic, “likened it to holding FedEx responsible if someone used its services to mail pornography.”

“Lacey, who has the words “hold fast” tattooed on his fingers, spoke with relish about the political and court fights ahead over Backpage.com. ‘It’s a retirement from journalism,’ he said. ‘This entire thing is still a First Amendment issue.’”

Andrea Powell of FAIR Girls, however, is undeterred. As she told Latitude News: “Village Voice Media stake holders separated themselves from Backpage.com because of our campaign.” She concedes that her cause will not have the same kind of leverage they had previously given there are no advertisers to put pressure on. But, she says, “we are not going to stop.”

“There is only one acceptable solution to FAIR Girls, and that is for Backpage.com to shut the adult section of their classified advertising web site and end the selling of girls online. For as long as Backpage.com exists, we will continue to fight for the rights of the girls being advertised by their pimps on Backpage.com.”

 

http://www.latitudenews.com/story/dutch-lessons-for-sex-trafficking-debate-in-u-s/

The Gawker Archives – Pickets, Lawsuits, Sex Ads, and Hard Times at the Village Voice

Gawker was an American blog founded by Nick Denton and Elizabeth Spiers and based in New York City focusing on celebrities and the media industry. It was launched in January 2003.

Whereas the Village Voice was a paper for newly minted New Yorkers, meaning people that moved into New York with identity issues and bought the Paper to “be cool”,  the Gawker was a blog for New Yorkers.

The Gawker closed down in 2016 after thirteen years. The blog never catered to advertisers or “sold out”  for greed.  I was a regular reader and found it to be a straight forward New York smart blog.

I have had some difficulty lately finding certain issues they published.  As if the archives are being scrubbed.  If you follow any sequence at the Web Site you will notice some pages “Can’t be found”.

This has been frustrating me since I considered the reporting from that blog valuable information.   So being, I am taking the liberty to share some of the articles here for the purpose of preservation.

 

http://gawker.com/5860101/pickets-lawsuits-sex-ads-and-hard-times-at-the-village-voice

 

Pickets, Lawsuits, Sex Ads, and Hard Times at the Village Voice

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Filed to: MEDIA

The Village Voice has problems. The paper had yet another round of layoffs last month, as part of a nationwide cull by its parent company. (Not to be confused with the other layoffs earlier this year.) Like most alt-weeklies, the Voice depends on sex and drug ads for its very survival. The paper’s so desperate for revenue that it’s suing Time Out NY for using the phrase “Best in NYC.” You know that belongs to the Village Voice, right?

And today, Voice staffers get the funnest bonus yet: a big protest at their headquarters! (Photos here.) An anti-sex-trafficking group is picketing the Voice today to protest the sex ads on Backpage.com, the Craigslist doppelganger that more or less keeps Village Voice Media afloat. (A recent lawsuit against Backpage failed, and considering the financial situation of alt-weeklies today, don’t expect it to cut off any revenue streams voluntarily any time soon.) Alicia Keys and Gloria Steinem will both be there, reportedly, so be sure to go and stare slack-jawed!

Village Voice Media sent out an internal letter to employees telling them to “respect the rights” of the protesters, but making clear that the company disagrees with them, and asserting that “Village Voice Media is the industry leader in policing our site to keep underage kids out of adult classifieds.” Well… who else would be to be policing your site? Eh. We asked Voice editor Tony Ortega for his take:

Ah, you know. I loved Nick Pinto’s story last week about NYU. I thought Graham Rayman had a good get this week on Ray Kelly. Next week, for Thanksgiving, we have a treat from Jen Doll. I mean, that’s what you do, right? You just keep it going, week after week, while hoping someday Obama pulls his head out of his ass and gets this economy going again. I’d like to start hiring again, dammit.

As for the protests today, I wish them the best of luck. No one who actually works in this office has anything to do with Backpage, but still, I understand why they picked our building. The people who work for Eater and Foursquare — won’t they have stories to tell.

Keep on truckin, alt-weeklies. Keep on truckin, protesters. And keep on truckin, online classified sex ad patrons. You’re all in this together.

[Photo via VillageVoicePimp.com]

The Gawker Archives – Village Voice Media Asked to Make Up Lie About ‘Monitoring’ Its Hooker Site

Gawker was an American blog founded by Nick Denton and Elizabeth Spiers and based in New York City focusing on celebrities and the media industry. It was launched in January 2003.

Whereas the Village Voice was a paper for newly minted New Yorkers, meaning people that moved into New York with identity issues and bought the Paper to “be cool”,  the Gawker was a blog for New Yorkers.

The Gawker closed down in 2016 after thirteen years. The blog never catered to advertisers or “sold out”  for greed.  I was a regular reader and found it to be a straight forward New York smart blog.

I have had some difficulty lately finding certain issues they published.  As if the archives are being scrubbed.  If you follow any sequence at the Web Site you will notice some pages “Can’t be found”.

This has been frustrating me since I considered the reporting from that blog valuable information.   So being, I am taking the liberty to share some of the articles here for the purpose of preservation.

Village Voice Media Asked to Make Up Lie About ‘Monitoring’ Its Hooker Site

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Filed to: MEDIA ROUNDUP

In your merciless Wednesday media column: attorneys general come after Backpage.com, a photo editor bravely falls on his sword, a new CFO at NewsBeast, Conde Nast figures out the internets, and the amusing NYT-Yahoo rumor.

  • The attorneys general of 45 states have sent a letter to Village Voice Media regarding its Craigslist knockoff Backpage.com, asking the company “to prove it is monitoring the site to prevent illegal activity.” Haha, what? Then nobody would put their ads there! Stupid idiots. Also most state attorneys general are big Ashton Kutcher fans.

The Gawker Archives – Village Voice Media’s Last Ditch Effort to Save Itself Will Probably Fail

Gawker was an American blog founded by Nick Denton and Elizabeth Spiers and based in New York City focusing on celebrities and the media industry. It was launched in January 2003.

Whereas the Village Voice was a paper for newly minted New Yorkers, meaning people that moved into New York with identity issues and bought the Paper to “be cool”,  the Gawker was a blog for New Yorkers.

The Gawker closed down in 2016 after thirteen years. The blog never catered to advertisers or “sold out”  for greed.  I was a regular reader and found it to be a straight forward New York smart blog.

I have had some difficulty lately finding certain issues they published.  As if the archives are being scrubbed.  If you follow any sequence at the Web Site you will notice some pages “Can’t be found”.

This has been frustrating me since I considered the reporting from that blog valuable information.   So being, I am taking the liberty to share some of the articles here for the purpose of preservation.

12.26K

09/24/12 09:20AM

Filed to: MEDIA

Village Voice Media, owner of the Voice and a dozen other alt-weeklies across the country, has decided to try a nifty trick: it’s cleaving itself in two. Executives from the company are “buying out” all of the papers, putting them into what is technically a new, standalone company. And VVM’s main profit center, hooker ad site Backpage.com, is going to be left in its own separate company, controlled by VVM bosses Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey. This is a weird gambit.

The only rational reason to do this is to try to end the ongoing (and successful) PR campaign that’s been waged against the company over its ownership of Backpage, which has a pesky tendency of hosting ads for child prostitutes or sex trafficked girls once in a while. Advertisers have fled the company’s alt-weeklies as a result of the bad publicity over the past year or more. But more advertisers have fled the company’s alt-weeklies due to facts that A) Craigslist took all the classified advertising away from alt-weeklies, and B) print newspaper advertising in general has been dying for a decade. In short, alt-weeklies are a dying business model. So what’s the plan here?

I mean, sure, fine, you spin off Backpage (which had revenue close to $30 million last year, and which is a very successful business, due to the fact that it’s occupying a niche that Craigslist decided to get out of), and maybe, maybe you quiet down all the boycotts of the newspapers, which are now in a separate company. But, so what? You now have a company consisting solely of alt-weeklies, which are a dying business model, and without the hooker ad revenue that was keeping the whole thing afloat. Where is the logic? There’s a bit of obscurity in the deal—it could be that Backpage’s owners will simply turn around and funnel that money back into the papers as investors. Or, maybe it’s true what Scott Tobias, the new CEO of the group of newspapers, says to Keith Kelly:

He insisted the new company is “absolutely” profitable without the lucrative Backpage and that he has no connection to or investment in the site.

That would absolutely blow my mind if true, but… who are we to say? I mean, logically, it seems more likely that these alt-weeklies will just continue their downward spiral faster without all that hooker ad money, unless there is some financial trickery here that we’re missing. But hey, we’re pulling for them. Good luck to all alt-weekly employees, for as long as it lasts.

[Photo: Stan Wiechers/ Flickr]

 

http://gawker.com/5945821%2Fvillage-voice-medias-last-ditch-effort-to-save-itself-will-probably-fail

 

 

Every American is Paying For Mike Lacey and James Larkin’s Child Sex Trafficking On Backpage

 

Annual cost to Americans for Lacey and Larkins Backpage on line human trafficking business, which reaps them millions of dollars per month, costs the taxpayers millions monthly.  And this does not include law enforcement expenses and medical expenses.

If you do not pay taxes so you are thinking your tax dollars are not being used to deal with this, think again. Tax dollars that could be used for other purposes which affect you directly, are now being used to deal with Mike Lacey and James Larkin.  Who are making millions from their on line web site Backpage devoted to human trafficking. One arrest report evidenced them rewarding themselves with a ten million dollar “bonus” one year.

In the beginning, it was only costing Americans millions of dollars per month in law enforcement struggles which went all the way to senate investigations.

Now the annual cost only for running damage control on sex trafficking is hitting  American citizens at a cost of 56 million a year.  Law enforcement expenses across 52 states would tower over that.

Pimps, prostitutes and child trafficking victims do not contribute to the country’s tax revenue.  They tax the system.

Last month, a lawmaker introduced a bill that would spend more than $56 million to help victims and to train students and law enforcement officers to recognize the signs of trafficking.  More than 40 lawmakers have signed on as co-sponsors.

 “What I discovered was a lot of legislators were aware it was happening in their districts, but had no idea what to do about it,” says Rep. Bill Brawley, a Matthews Republican and chief sponsor.

House Bill 910 would allocate $37.5 million for shelter beds, $13.5 million for mental health services, and $4.5 million to educate students on the warning signs for trafficking. Brawley says a bed and services can cost up to $40,000 a year for each victim. Mental health services could cost another $15,000.

“It’s huge,” Mark Blackwell, executive director of Charlotte’s Justice Ministries says of the proposed allocation. “Money is what’s needed in this fight. We’re operating on a shoe-string budget.”

Last year his nonprofit served 150 women who were trafficking victims. “It’s pretty much all we can handle as a small, grass-roots group,” he says.

It is unclear how many minors are forced into prostitution each year, but the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children said reports of online child sex trafficking had increased by more than 800 percent from 2010 to 2015. The organization said this was “directly correlated to the increased use of the internet to sell children for sex.”

Backpage  revenues increased to $135 million in 2014 from $5.3 million in 2008, derived more than 90 percent of its earnings from its sex ads, according to the California Department of Justice.

Lacey, Larkin, and former Editor in Chief of the Village Voice, Tony Ortega, who hosted the Backpage classifieds section as part of the Village Voice, claim human trafficking is “Freedom of Speech”.

“Neither government officials nor God’s advocates can dictate such arbitrary control of business or speech,” read their response.

“Seven years ago, the people I work for were smart enough to start Backpage.com, a competitor to Craigslist,” the Voice’s Tony Ortega, who authored a number of stories criticizing concerns over sex trafficking on American shores as nothing more than “mass paranoia,” wrote in July. “What happens when two adults find each other through Backpage.com? I couldn’t tell you … [It] exists solely so that people can freely express themselves—sometimes in ways that make other people uncomfortable. We’re First Amendment extremists that way. Always have been.”

Malika Saada Saar, a Washington-based advocate for women and girls’ rights, Google’s Senior Counsel on Civil and Human Rights and co-founder and Executive Director of the Human Rights Project for Girls (Rights4Girls),  says that flying the flag of free speech is nothing more than a hollow, if savvy, defense tactic. “If I tried to sell crack online through Backpage, the Village Voice would not stand up and say this is about the first amendment,” she says—noting that there’s an exemption for advertising for drugs in the Communications Decency Act, but whereas there’s no such exemption for escort services, even when it amounts to little more than thinly veiled prostitution. “ It’s convenient and politically easy for them to frame this as a free speech issue and it’s not. It’s a human rights issue.”

Upon selling the Village Voice, Lacey was still protesting.  Lacey, who has the words “hold fast” tattooed on his fingers, spoke with relish about the political and court fights ahead over Backpage.com. ‘It’s a retirement from journalism,’ he said. ‘This entire thing is still a First Amendment issue.’”

 

And so far a superior court judge in Sacramento agrees with Lacey, Larkin and Ortega, and has thrown the case out of court laying waste to millions of dollars in legal expenses carried by American citizens.  Sacramento County Superior Court Judge Michael G. Bowman ruled that websites such as Backpage.com are protected from lawsuits when they publish speech posted by other people.  The judge said the Communications Decency Act of 1996 “struck a balance in favor of free speech” in keeping Internet service providers protected from liability.  Ruling corporate profits have seniority over the human rights of homeless children.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/mar/17/senate-cites-backpagecom-contempt-congress/

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-backpage-charges-tossed-20161209-story.html

This ruling strangely aligning with shocking reports of a racketeering scandal in Sacramento involving judges and other tax paid employees taking kick backs and selling children.

http://sacramentocountyfamilycourtnews.blogspot.com/p/temporary-judges.html

kids4cash

The comments on the bottom of this announcement about an investigation into California’s Child Protective Services in 2013 are most alarming.  Perhaps not the best arena to try a case like child sex trafficking.

alwatchdog.com/2013/06/06/state-auditor-will-scrutinize-child-protective-services/

And don’t forget, our tax dollars also paid the judge to throw the Backpage case out of court.

In 2013 Lacey and Larkin took the taxpayers of Arizona for 3.75 million dollars in a wrongful arrest law suit.  And bragged about it on the cover of another paper they own. Phoenix New Times.  The year before they awarded themselves each 10 million dollar bonus from their company.  Imagine still wanting the taxpayers of Arizona to pony up 3.75 million to their overfilling coffers.

“The profit they were making was obscene,” says Sen. Claire McCaskill, who co-authored the the senate report on Backpage. “And the fact they were comfortable making that profit on the backs of children that were being sold for sex — it’s hard to contemplate that kind of evil.”

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/joe-arpaio-loses-new-times-co-founders-win-375-million-settlement-for-2007-false-arrests-6651491

Backpage.com has earned Larkin millions and allowed him to live a life usually reserved for top-tier celebrities and Fortune 500 businessmen. Larkin’s palatial estate in Phoenix, Arizona is certainly one of the most impressive properties ever seen on “Cribs.”

The 64,000 square-foot home comes complete with two pools, a twelve-seat movie theatre, an indoor basketball court, a guest house, and eight bedrooms.

Congress and Backpage have been at war for several years, costing the taxpayers millions upon millions,and lawmakers have passed legislation aimed at cracking down on online sex trafficking.

Backpage (Lacey and Larkin) sued (U.S. taxpayers again) late last year to try to stop the Stop Advertising Victims of Exploitation (SAVE) Act from being used against the company. Backpage argued that the law was written so vaguely that it could end up ensnaring publications that do try to weed out illicit activities but inadvertently miss some postings.

Backpage hosts online classified ad pages for more than 400 U.S. cities. This is just in the United States. Senators say some of those ads involve people who have been trafficked for purposes of sex, including minors.

“Sex trafficking has thrived on the Internet in part because of the high profitability and relatively low risk associated with advertising trafficking victims’ services online in multiple locations,” the Senate subcommittee said in its report urging the contempt citation. “With the aid of online advertising, traffickers can maximize profits, evade law-enforcement detection, and maintain control of victims by transporting them quickly within and between states.”

“Child sex trafficking in America today is a corporate enterprise,” says Yiota Souras, general counsel for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. “Child sex trafficking happens in every state, in every community, in every jurisdiction. It’s big business and it’s one of the worst crimes imaginable.”

A blistering bipartisan report released from the U.S. Senate’s Subcommittee on Investigations found that “Backpage has knowingly concealed evidence of criminality by systematically editing” advertisements to disguise the fact that they involve prostitution and child sex trafficking.

The state of California recently charged Ferrer, Lacey and Larkin with money laundering and conspiracy to commit pimping. All three pleaded not guilty to the charges.

“All they did was publish and get paid,” said attorney James Grant, according to the Sacramento Bee. He argued that prosecutors were instead cracking down on “free speech.”

“The state doesn’t have the right to prosecute, but they’re using this to continue their investigation. This process needs to stop,” Backpage attorney James Grant told Sacramento Superior Court Judge Lawrence Brown.

Law suits that have been filed on behalf of children sold, raped and tortured courtesy Backpage, have been tossed out of court.

Quite simply, America has become the land of “no mercy” with ruthless disregard to the human rights of children, when in competition with corporate pirates.  And American citizens are picking up the cost of the injustice and collateral damages.

 

http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/video/backpage-execs-forced-face-sex-trafficking-allegations-part-44753235

And we have infected several other countries, and every major city in them, with the same plague, as Backpage has gone viral. Those people have no recourse either, as Lacey and Larkin are protected citizens of the United States. And we protected them as established  Backpage  on line sex trafficking  in the following countries:

Canada

Europe

Albania

Austria

Belarus

Belgium

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Croatia

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Denmark

Estonia

Finland

France

Germany

Greece

Hungary

Iceland

Ireland

Italy

Kosovo

Latvia

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Macedonia

Malta

Monaco

Montenegro

Netherlands

Norway

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russia

Serbia

Slovakia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Ukraine

United Kingdom

Asia, Pacific, and Middle East

Bahrain

Bangladesh

China

Hong Kong

India

Indonesia

Israel

Japan

Jordan

Korea

Kuwait

Lebanon

Macau

Malaysia

Mongolia

Oman

Pakistan

Philippines

Qatar

Singapore

Taiwan

Thailand

Turkey

United Arab Emirates

Vietnam

Australia and Oceania

Australia

Guam

New Zealand

Latin America and Caribbean

Argentina

Belize

Bolivia

Brazil

Caribbean

Chile

Colombia

Costa Rica

Ecuador

El Salvador

Guatemala

Guyana

Honduras

Mexico

Nicaragua

Panama

Paraguay

Peru

Suriname

Uruguay

Venezuela

Africa

Cameroon

Egypt

Ivory Coast

Morocco

Nigeria

South Africa

For more information see:

http://www.iamjanedoefilm.com

 

The Gawker Archives on Village Voice Child Sex Trafficking

Gawker was an American blog founded by Nick Denton and Elizabeth Spiers and based in New York City focusing on celebrities and the media industry. It was launched in January 2003.

Whereas the Village Voice was a paper for newly minted New Yorkers, meaning people that moved into New York with identity issues and bought the Paper to “be cool”,  the Gawker was a blog for New Yorkers.

The Gawker closed down in 2016 after thirteen years. The blog never catered to advertisers or “sold out”  for greed.  I was a regular reader and found it to be a straight forward New York smart blog.

I have had some difficulty lately finding certain issues they published.  As if the archives are being scrubbed.  If you follow any sequence at the Web Site you will notice some pages “Can’t be found”.

This has been frustrating me since I considered the reporting from that blog valuable information.   So being, I am taking the liberty to share some of the articles here for the purpose of preservation.

Village Voice Has a Child Prostitution Problem (Updated)

Craigslist shut down its Adult Services section, caving to Attorneys General and anti-sex trafficking groups. But, as we pointed out, there are many other places to buy sex online. One, Backpage.com, is being sued by a former child prostitute.

According to Ars Technica, the former child prostitue was hawked on Backpage.com—a Craigslist knockoff owned by Village Voice Media—by her pimp starting at age 14. In her lawsuit, she claims that VVM knew that the explicit pictures her pimp posted of her on Backpage depicted a minor, and that they were advertising prostitution. This knowledge, the suit argues, should put exempt them from the Communications Decency Act, which protects websites from liability for what their users post.

From Ars Technica:

“Defendant had a strong suspicion that the aforementioned crimes were being committed,” reads the complaint. “Defendant had a desire that these posters accomplished their nefarious illegal prostitution activities so that the posters would return to the website and pay for more posting.”

Look for anti-trafficking activists and Attorneys General, flush from their victory over Craigslist, to jump on Backpage and its thriving “adult” section next. The Village Voice sure has been having a lot of penis-related financial troubles, lately. (via mediaite)

Update:
We’ve received a statement from Village Voice Media’s Steve Suskind. In it, he writes:

The lawsuit is riddled with errors. The claim that we knowingly assisted [the child’s pimp] in committing criminal acts is a lie fabricated by a trial lawyer looking for a payday. The attorney seeks to redirect blame from a convicted predator to Backpage.com, which helped prosecute the criminal.

Without our knowledge, the predator violated our terms of use. Backpage.com has stringent safeguards in place to ensure that only adults use the site. We provided the FBI with the perpetrator’s I.P. address and credit-card information.

Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 recognized that the very nature of the Internet meant that vast traffic depended on the ability of citizens to post directly onto websites like Backpage.com, Facebook, MySpace or eBay, or to have search engines like Google and Yahoo find postings without pre-screening or censorship. The responsibility, under the law, rests with the person supplying the post.

In the last two years, Backpage.com has had 58 million posts, of which 6 million were adult. In this vast exchange of information, law enforcement agencies have asked for our testimony in precisely five underage cases.

Because one case is too many, we have, and we will continue to, cooperate willingly with authorities.

09/19/10 01:58PM

Filed to: PROSTITUTION
NOTE: Village Voice Media did not cooperate with Authorities and owners were held in contempt of Congress.   Furthermore it was discovered the moderators at Village Voice Classifieds were coaching people on how to place the ads and pocketing the advertising dollars. 
 Minors are trafficking victims.  There is no such thing as a child prostitute. By definition & law, minors are trafficked.